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Mona Chalabi

Mona Chalabi is a data journalist who lives in New York.

She is a writer. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Review of Books, New York Magazine, The Guardian and many more. She has written for radio and TV including NPR, Gimlet, Netflix (The Fix), BBC (Is Britain Racist? Radio 4 and The Frankie Boyle show) and National Geographic (Star Talk).

She is also an illustrator whose work has been commended by the Royal Statistical Society. Her work has been exhibited at several galleries including the Tate, The Design Museum and the House of Illustration.

Lastly, she’s a producer and presenter. She’s one half of the team that created the Emmy-nominated video series Vagina Dispatches. And she presented and produced the audio experiment Strange Bird.

Before she became a journalist, Mona worked with large data sets in jobs at the Bank of England, Transparency International and the International Organization for Migration. She studied International Relations in Paris and studied Arabic in Jordan. Mona was born and raised in London.

Monas Instagram

Mona Chalabi
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Design Museum

Nominated for the 2019 Beazley Designs of The Year award, her work was on show at London’s Design Museum Oct 2019 – Feb 2020.

W.E.B. Du Bois

House of Illustration • London • Nov 2019 – March 2020

Revered by everyone from Martin Luther King Jr. to Beyoncé, W. E. B. Du Bois stands as one of the most important and influential African American activists and intellectuals of the 20th century. As co-founder of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) and author of the seminal book The Souls of Black Folk, Du Bois is celebrated for his profound and prolific writings. But alongside his famous essays, Du Bois produced an astounding – yet little-known – body of infographics to challenge pseudo-scientific racism, making visual arguments every bit as powerful as his textual ones.

W. E. B. Du Bois: Charting Black Lives displays the complete set of 63 graphics shown at the 1900 Paris Exposition, produced by Du Bois and a team of African American students from his sociology laboratory at Atlanta University. These visually innovative graphs, charts and maps formed a radical new approach to refuting racism, using strikingly presented facts and statistics to counter contemporary white supremacy.

Who Are You Here To See?

London • May 7-22 2019

 

This exhibition was about the ways that women and people of color are not allowed to take up space. Shoved into the background with a “that’s nice, keep trying” smile. Told that we’ll be worthy of inclusion if we just keep working a little bit harder for it. By visualising the extent of inequality in art spaces, I hope to help eliminate the excuses for it.

As well as paintings about inequality in the art world, the exhibition was a retrospective of work I’ve created over the past five years. It also included the work of 16 other artists who responded to a call out, curated alongside Korantema Anyimadu.

Find out more here.

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